Get more with LA band, 7 Less

There’s nothing like a sweet, charming pop song to brighten your day or at least make it a little bit brighter. Add a little rock to it, and you get a certain energy with that quiet twinge of funk. This combination will addict you and draw you closer. In this genre, and with this style of rock-infused pop songs, artists can come to a happy medium and range – one that transcends the two genres gently while never fully leaving one or the other in the dark. Los Angeles-based band 7 Less embodies this combination discussed before. Their mixes of melodies and are creative yet simple and humane. Listen to them here performing their original song, “Don’t Go,” in their music video.

 

 

The group is relatively new – they only formed in the year of 2017. However, they’re already on a roll, producing songs and an EP and receiving acclaim from around the music industry. The band has been previewing their new six-track EP entitled “Two Sides of the Story” all around Los Angeles, and it even caught the attention of a Channel Islands music professor. Craig Bickel said that their song “Let’s Fall in Love” is “a lovely song with enormous potential.” Take a listen!

 

 

The three members of 7 Less have some interesting music backgrounds. Lead singer Marc Rasec picked up the guitar at age 11 and taught himself to play from music books his father gave him. From there, his music career blossomed, and he used his struggles in high school to add an emotional level to his songwriting and performing. The band’s drummer, John Htun, is the son of a well known Burmese artist named David Htun Htun. He moved out to Los Angeles in 2003 to immerse himself in the American music industry some more, and ended up meeting Rasec in 2016. The two of them teamed up for a few shows together and ultimately decided that it was a match. Since then, their band received an endorsement from Zion Cymbals for a few of their music videos and a contract for the band’s upcoming projects. Obviously, they are off to a great start as a band. Take a look at their official music video for their original song, “New Zealand.”

 

 

 

7 Less is off to a pretty much ideal and fantastic start in Los Angeles thus far, and they’re on a roll. Be sure to check out their page to see when their next gig is, so you can go and support these guys in concert. If you get the chance to see them live, you’re in for a treat.

Spotlight on Alex Bloom: The College-Grad Among Us With An Album

It typically takes people a long time, or a while, or a lifetime to figure out what they want to do (in your career, in your life). And it usually takes even longer for most of us to figure out what we are good at (in our careers, and in our lives). Through the rose-colored frames that artistry brings, it’s easy to imagine that the creative types have it all mapped out in front of them. From the outside looking it, the artists seem cosmically preordained.

Gigmor sat down with Alex Bloom, a recent graduate of USC’s Thorton School of Music. A couple of months after graduation, he released his first solo project, Blue Room. Lyrically and musically, the album is touching. It’s only noticeable similarity to music today is in how original it is. Blue Room has complex simplicity —á la the Beatles—with nuances of Fleet Foxes folk and something similar to Elliot Smith. It’s a first album to be proud of. Alex spoke with us about his college experience, his non-cosmic ordination, and how he wrote the album.

Gigmor: So, you did it!  You made an album!

Alex: May 6th it was finished. And then I finished up a short film that will be coming out to soon for the album. feels like something coming to a close. I’ve been getting a lot of really great feedback, and it’s opening a lot of doors to writing with other artists or producing with them.

It’s like updating your LinkedIn profile after you getting a job, isn’t it? The second you get a job, the Internet starts e-mailing you.

Yes it’s like that. When I put out the album I started getting contacted by more musicians and artists being like, “Oh, you make music, too? Great, yes let’s collaborate.” And it’s really nice to feel some sort of validation for all that I’ve been working on for so long. In the meantime, when all things aren’t focused on writing and music, I’ve been working in a studio. I help with production and other little odd jobs around the studio. So that’s been cool. I don’t know, life is in a little bit of weird place right now.

Preach, same.

I spend a majority of my time writing demos and working on music.

I have another age-related question for you. I think that a lot of kids our age (the recent college grads and 20-somethings) are going through the motions of what they think they should be doing right now. They aren’t sure how happy it will make them in the long-term or even sometimes in the short-term, but they are doing it anyways. Do you feel that way ever about music? I’m trying to imagine what these feelings would be like for a young musician or artist or anyone that has started in on some specific, more creative path.

I’ve been working on music since I was about fourteen or fifteen years old. I’ve always had that to fall back on no matter what happens. Going to music school was kind of a consequence of that. I wanted to make music and become a better musician in whatever capacity I could. I still have this thing, writing songs and doing music in general. I guess the difference between me coming home from music school and someone like you coming back from Michigan — they have a job that they go to from 9 to 5. There is more structure there. I do all my ‘work’ on my own time. Or all the time. I don’t know, it sounds cliché.

No, no it doesn’t, it makes sense. You’ve figured it all out then, no more struggle.

(laughing) Yes, yes I’m set. No more struggle. Life is perfect.

Great, excellent. Interview over.

No, honestly it feels more like a constant struggle. I worked with a producer once who asked me about my highest aspiration for my music career and where I see it going. And I couldn’t really answer him, because I haven’t really thought that far ahead. So it’s pretty scary because I don’t know what lies ahead, and I don’t know what will be required from me moving forward in this career path. I just have to keep doing what I’ve been always doing since I was a kid. I’m lucky that I get to do what I love, but it’s still pretty scary. So I combat that fear with low expectations.

Makes sense. Let’s get into the making of the album. How was the writing process for you?

I decided last summer that I wanted to record. I was making demos in a studio in my backyard. I watched a bunch of YouTube videos to teach myself different instruments, like learning how to play the drums and tune them, too. I loved doing it, and I learned how to arrange music in the process. A lot of these songs were from that. Three or four are just from me in my backyard. There are a couple others that will never see the light of day.

In terms of when and how I wrote them, it was a gradual thing that happened over the past year. I wrote “One More Shot” in November of this year. It really all came together at the end of the year — I was taking too many credits at school and things got busy. So I’m glad I eventually got myself to complete it.

How did your music school education play into the making of this album? I don’t imagine that you sat down and wrote charts out for it. It was probably more organic than that, like you just messing around in your backyard.

Yeah, yeah that’s interesting. Writing and composing music for class is so much different for a class. I took a music arranging class and learned a bunch of things that nobody really needs to know about. Or with music theory classes, I would look at the mathematics of music. But when I’m arranging and writing my own music it’s all just by ear. I’m not bogged down by the logistics of it all, of all those things I learned in school, and I think I’m lucky to still have that. That was one of my biggest fears when I got to college, especially since when I got there I didn’t know how to read music.

You listen to the Beatles. You can just tell from listening to your album that you listen to a lot of the Beatles.

Oh yeah. They are the band that I always go back to. They’re probably my favorite band.

It’s that developed pop song vibe you’ve got going that made me think that. The pop song that sounds simple but is highly developed. Kudos to you there.

Listen to Alex Bloom’s album, Blue Room, on Spotify, iTunes, and Apple Music, and make sure to check out his profile on Gigmor.

Photo by Halle Pelfrey

Product Updates October 2016

The Gigmor team has been working hard! We just launched a bunch of enhancements to the site and more are on the way. See below for more details and for tips on how to use the new features. Questions, comments or suggestions? Email us at info@gigmor.com. We’d love to hear from you.

 

New Look

We’ve been rolling out our new design in stages over the past few months and we’re proud to say we just completed that process. The new site has a cleaner look to make it easier for you to find what you need and connect with Gigmor artists and industry pros. It’s also a much better experience on mobile.

 

Book This Band

We’ve added a booking button to all Gigmor artist profiles. This is just a first step toward launching our gigs marketplace later this fall. Individuals and industry pros can now fill out a one-step form with details about a gig opportunity, including event type, pay and more. Gigmor artists will get a Booking Inquiry message and email right away. So, bandleaders watch your inbox!

 

Switch to SoundCloud

Gigmor now only accepts music through SoundCloud. In a few months we will no longer display music on your profile from any other sources so we highly recommend opening a SoundCloud account and connecting it to your Gigmor profile right away. Here’s how:

  1. Create a SoundCloud account by clicking here.
  2. Upload songs to your SoundCloud profile.
  3. Log in to Gigmor and connect your SoundCloud account to your Gigmor profile. To do this go to settings > scroll down to manage connected accounts > click on edit SoundCloud and paste the URL of your SoundCloud profile (ex: https://soundcloud.com/gigmor). Remember to click save after making any changes.
  4. On Gigmor go to settings > edit profile info > and scroll down to the section manage media. Click the button that says “Manage Soundcloud” and from there you can add the URL for any songs uploaded to your SoundCloud account. After you have copy and pasted the link click the + button to add that track to your profile then remember to click save to update your changes!
  5. From here you can edit which songs you want to be displayed on your profile, and you can always go back to make changes to the songs you show.

 

Add Your Address

We just greatly enhanced our location database. Now we need members’ street addresses, as well as city and zip. This means you’ll get faster and more accurate results in both matching and search. Click here to update your location now.

 

Coming Soon

This is just the beginning… Our mission is to make finding gigs and booking talent much easier. The whole world loves music so our dream is to make it easier than ever to hire live bands. Stay tuned for more news about our upcoming gigs marketplace.

Interested in joining our beta? Click here to get on our beta list.

Getting To Know You: Dan Turner of Washington D.C.’s deadbeatniks

Today’s feature is on Dan Turner and his band The deadbeatniks, a hip-hop/funk collective out of the nation’s capitol, Washington D.C. Dan, a Berklee College of Music grad, took some time to sit down with us to tell us about his musical roots as well as the band and their album Can. The band recently moved down to New Orleans to get “weirder and jazzier” and work on their new album. Check out what Dan had to say below.

 

Gigmor: Thanks so much for taking the time to talk with us at Gigmor! First question, how did the deadbeatniks get started?

Dan: We have all been friends for a very long time, all kind of doing our own music. Then we said, “Screw it, why aren’t we doing this together?” I’m originally a sound engineer, one of us is a visual artist, and the other one is a classical jazz player. So we kind of just brought all three of those together you know, making music, making videos. As far as the name, it’s just kind of a joke at one point and we ran with it. Also, side note, the d is lower case.

 

G: Noted. What’s in store for deadbeatniks? Any new music coming out?

D: Yeah we’ve got some new music and videos coming out, we’re trying to have our album done by 2017. We should have some new videos out in the next couple months we’ll be sure to post them on our Gigmor page. We’ve got this new song about Daiquiris, we’ve been obsessed with them ever since moving down to New Orleans, and we’re actually going to the New Orleans Daiquiri Festival next weekend so we’re going to shoot the video for our song then.

 

G: Wow, very cool. So personally, what’s your musical background? When did you start playing?

D: I’ve played drums since I was 14 but really now a days I’ve been focusing on mixing–I’ve been doing sound engineering for about four years now. What I like to think about my musical career is–at this point–that I’ve got the ears for it, I’m more on the production side. We just moved down to New Orleans and I’ve been connecting with a lot of great brass musicians.

 

G: Do you have any solo work out?

D: I have some beats and stuff but pretty much everything I do is for deadbeatniks.

 

G: What/Who are your inspirations behind deadbeatnik’s songwriting? Kristen Ritter?

D: Pretty women yeah for sure Kristen Ritter is definitely an influence. But in terms of musicians…uhhhh… Gorillas, Portishead, and Ol’ Dirty Bastard.

G: What was the songwriting process of making your album Can like?

D: It wasn’t rushed, it wasn’t like we had songwriting sessions. We would just hang out and you know, we’d have a wall full of ideas… like a creative wall. So we didn’t force anything we just kind of let it play its self out. It was simply a group of great individuals with great ideas just bringing it all together. We didn’t really have a process.

 

G: Well you guys definitely have a great sound. Now in terms of Gigmor. How did you find out about the site? What do you like about it?

D: I just moved to a new city and saw an ad online about it. I just thought it couldn’t hurt to try and connect with as many new musicians as possible. What I like about it– it’s aesthetically pleasing and easy to find what you’re looking for. Keep it up!

 

G: Well Dan thanks so much for the input and talking with us today. Check out deadbeatnik’s album Can here and give them a follow to keep track of their upcoming releases.

 

Written by Gigmor guest blogger: Ari Kapner

Gigmor’s Saxiest Videos

Saxophone is my favorite instrument that I, sadly, cannot play. Today I want to highlight some of the best sax players Gigmor has to offer. Whenever saxophone is added to a group’s dynamic, it is a surefire way to add some spirit to your performance and some soul to your sound. Adding a saxophone player might be the perfect one-up your band needs so check out a few of our favorite videos featuring musicians performing brass-wind.

 

First up is Peter Van Siclen, an extremely talented songwriter/composer. Peter got his Masters in Jazz Composition from UMass Amherst. Check out his looping cover of “The Damariscotta Shake” on sax and his wind synth. This guy is seriously talented and looking to compose and perform more so be sure to shoot him a follow and reach out.

 

 

Next up is a 15 year old Collin Logatto, better known to Gigmor as MrSaxMusic. A Long Island teen, Collin is extremely talented for his age. He has played at CitiField during a Mets game, as well as all over New York. Enjoy the young talent’s solo from Bruce Springsteen’s “Thunder Road” and be sure to follow his page on Gigmor.

 

 

Willie Moore is proud to call himself a saxophone player. He hopes to meet more people across the industry who can push him to become as good of a musician as he can possibly be. Willie specializes in Soprano sax and loves to play jazz and neo-soul. Check out his smooth sounds below and be sure to follow his page and reach out.

 

 

Written by Gigmor guest blogger: Ari Kapner