host a gig

Host a Gig in Your Own Space

Live music is one of the most effective marketing tools for businesses. In fact, 90% of live music fans say that brands can enhance the live music experience and 63% of fans say they are more likely to connect with brands during a live music event (https://www.adweek.com/brand-marketing/90-of-live-music-fans-say-brands-can-actually-enhance-the-experience/). Hosting a gig in your own space is one of the cheapest and most effective ways to build a real relationship with your customers. 

At the Governors Ball Music Festival, both Subway and Citibank experienced tremendous success with their promotions. Subway hosted a tasting area with sandwiches and other refreshments that included a DJ and Citibank had a private viewing area for Citibank cardholders.

It’s one thing to realize the potential that live music could have on your marketing strategy but it’s quite another to plan and host a gig. The good news is that it’s a lot easier than you think. Follow these steps and you’ll be hosting your first gig before you know it!

  1. Make sure your space is good to go.
    • Ask yourself a few logistical questions to get an idea of what kind of artist you want to book and when you want to schedule the concert. How many bathrooms do you have/need? Will the neighbors be angry if you book a metal band? Stuff like that. 
  2. Artist booking and scheduling.
    • Obviously, Friday and Saturday nights are the most popular nights for live music but they also have the most competition. Hosting a concert mid week could be a great strategy if your neighborhood has good pedestrian traffic. 
    • Artist booking is the fun part. What kind of artists do your customers listen to? What kind of music resonates with your brand? Once you decide this, you can create your gig post (link) and find a band. Make sure the artist knows what equipment they need to bring and what you can supply. If you don’t have speakers or microphones, no worries! Most artists are used to this and will be able to supply their own gear. 
  3. Promote and plan.
    • Once you’ve set a date and booked an artist you can finally start to promote. Artists will help carry the burden so make sure they are posting to their social media and getting their fans to come. You should do the same – put flyers on your sales counter, send a message to your email list, post to social, put a sign outside your store. Do everything you can to get people excited and bring them in the door. 
  4. Show time! Hosting the gig
    • So, you found a band, promoted the show and and brought people in the door. Congratulations! Now, make the most of it. Make sure people know where they are and what you do. Yes, it should be obvious, but don’t take that for granted. If you’re a gym, pass out flyers for membership discounts. When you’re introducing the band, introduce yourself, talk about your business. Pass out free samples. TAKE PICTURES AND VIDEO. Rinse and repeat. 

It may seem daunting, but once you get going you’ll find it’s a much smoother process than you think. Remember, we’re here to help! 

Good luck, 
Team Gigmor

American Idol Partners with Gigmor

music marketing promotion

Music marketing for the independent artist: a conversation with Kevin Wright of Ramsay Mulholland Events

Gigmor sat down with Kevin Wright, the man running the show in the Marketing and Artist Development department at Ramsay Mulholland Events in Los Angeles. Kevin offered some insight into how to be successful as an independent artist and how he and the rest of the team at Ramsay Mulholland Events are working to better the music marketing process for musicians today.

People generally describe music marketing as a thing of the past, but it seems like you and the team at Ramsey Mulholland have found a way around that. Tell me a little bit more about exactly what Ramsey Mulholland does.

Yes, of course! So we’re sort of set up in two different halves: accessible artist development for independent and local artists or entrepreneurs and the second is college-based touring and education.

Ok, let’s begin with that first part — what does artist development mean at Ramsay Mulholland?

What I saw when I was working at the label was that there wasn’t much we could do for people. The biggest artists are staying home anyways and doing their own thing — so what we noticed at the record label was that no matter how fast we move or how nimble we are, we can’t connect to the culture as efficiently as those who just are already in those cities and are currently experiencing that culture. Nashville, Austin, Atlanta, Chicago — they’ve all blown up, and the people who have grown from those places are choosing to stay there. Working at a record label taught me that and led me to decide that, well, maybe we should just switch the model. We started looking for artists who are just working on themselves in the space that they are from in specific areas across the United States. I wanted to take what I had learned as a label scout and give it to those independent artists and entrepreneurs throughout the United States so that they could reach a viable level of fame on their own. We are also trying to show them what they need and what they don’t.

So what does your interpretation of artists development and showcase entail?

It includes an artist meet-up and showcase. We saw that old model — where you get in front of a scout and anything could happen — and decided to flip it on its head a little bit where we act as the scouts that people get in front of but then we tell them what we think they should be working on to get noticed. We also try to get to know and work with artists before we get there and when we get there — until we leave honestly — just because the time we spend there will be so limited. We want to be able to speak of them and their act as well or as fully as possible because there is only so much we can do and say based on one specific performance. The more interaction and consumption of the artist, the better.

So the initial college tour will include thirty cities. We have invited artists, producers, DJs, managers, booking agents, and anybody that’s around the music scene in those cities to those events and we want to bring them together to connect and network. It’s 30 cities and about 10-12 artists for each.

What’s the college-based portion of your efforts entail?

It’s essentially the same thing as the artist development work we are doing — it’s a showcase and music meet-up. When I saw the guys trying to put the showcases together I remembered my time as a scout. I remembered people coming up to me when they were trying to put events together and using me as a scout at that time. They would go through the immense hassle of having to put an event together. And I remember wishing that when I was in college that there would have been an opportunity like this. I would have loved to have gotten involved — and I had the necessary skill set but no where to put it! So the idea of these showcases was sort of born out of that — they are not just for college artists, they are for the entrepreneurs and the business students as well. And the best part about it, honestly, is that it is for them and by them, with them being the college students who understand the community and music scenes around them.

From September through December of this year we are doing local showcases and then from January to May we are going to do the college showcases.

What is it behind all of this kind of work that drives you to do it?

Some of it comes from fighting for the independent artist but it’s also that the industry is changing super rapidly. It’s all changing so fast; I consider myself a student of the game and how it once was and what it will be due to the internet and the different ways by which we now as a culture consume music.

Everybody knows the artist, but what I learned when I got into the industry I learned that there are people behind the scenes — individuals like a Clive Davis or a David Geffen— that are 100 times bigger than you could ever imagine. For every one superstar that you could imagine they’ve got ten or twenty underneath their belt. Those guys are the real special ones, but the power there has been reduced over time. But that sort of power has been reduced, and now the artist almost has to create it on their own. The A&R men and women of the past were buying and then funding independent labels. I love that — they were removing the economic burden of these independent labels so that artists could have all the space to capture their work. They were funding them to have artistic freedom which is something that we hope to replicate on these college tours.

I wanted to bring that into the 21st-century music scene. All of these college kids think that they should be working towards a record label and how to suit those record labels in some way — and I’m trying to communicate to them and the entrepreneurs or business students around them that that old form is dead. The music industry is a changing game, and I want to relay those changes to these kids so that they and all their talent can react accordingly.

Everyone seems to have a negative outlook on the music industry. But you seem to have a hopeful outlook on it all, despite the criticisms of the masses. Why are you hopeful?

I remain super hopeful about the music industry, you’re dead-on. The music industry is healthier than it has ever been; there are more options for everybody and there are more ways to make money than ever before. In the transition, you had to lose some. You had to break a lot of eggs to make this omelette. But I really believe that it’s better and more inclusive than it has ever been. And it’s growing pretty rapidly. Most of us, us being the industry people, have to figure out how it is that our audiences are finding music now. It’s still pretty vague how people are consuming and looking for music, but we are getting better.

What’s even better about the current reality in the music industry is that it is a meritocracy. So if it’s great it’s going to survive and if it’s not it’s going to die quickly because that what the public decided.

What is some of the best advice you could give to artists who are trying to promote and market their music?

I think that the most important thing is take the time and do your homework. I have my own label and that’s where I’m pulling this understanding from. It always starts with the music; everything starts with the music. People always come in and ask me: how are we going to promote this? And what about PR? And to all of that I always tell them to just go and make the music and you’ll be surprised how many opportunities come your way.

So one, make the music. And then two, do your homework. There are so many good songs that go out and no one is working to make sure that you are collecting royalties. It costs $9 to put a single out on TuneCore. It’s not that hard to get your songs out on Spotify, and SoundCloud is great too; but always do your homework because there are so many good opportunities online right now that can help you be more successful.

Any other specific recommendations that you would offer to up-and-coming artists? 

I would tell individuals to learn what TuneCore is, and learn what distribution is or label promotion, too. It’s not that hard to have your songs out there and seen by the public, but do your homework so that you can guarantee that you are getting the most out of every outing or performance you do. If you have a song on YouTube that gets one million or 100,000 views and you don’t do your homework, you’re likely to not make a single dime from it.

There was one duo that I developed outside of a label were two brothers who were really active on Vine. They had 300 million and 600 million in their number of Vine views and they just weren’t putting it on YouTube. I put a bunch of their Vine videos together and used their cellphone to do a sort of intro; we put that up on YouTube and now they have a new record deal at 17 and 18 years old. From that post too they got a deal with YouTube and their multi-channel network — they were doing all of the hard work but they weren’t doing the homework.

It sounds like a lot of your tour is focusing on smaller cities in the United States that still have a vibrant music scene but aren’t necessarily that immediate go-to place that a lot of people would consider. This is intentional, I assume. Why is that?

You have to make your music palatable, and I always think that you should start small and capture the attention of that small city. If you can capture the attention on that smaller stage, you can then take it to another, more major level. Someone like a Bryson Tiller who is from Louisville, Kentucky where everyone in Kentucky knew exactly who he was. Then, when you’re entering the New York or Los Angeles scenes, you’ve got far more people consuming your music but a foundation of fans to fall back on.

Gigmor’s Crowdfunding Campaign

Four years ago I had a dream: to build technology that would help musicians find compatible players in their area. As any artist will tell you: the right musical connections can change your life!

Since then I’m proud to say we’ve achieved significant traction and national recognition as a musicians’ network and matching service. Now we’re building a best-of-breed booking marketplace that will streamline the process of hiring live talent.

Starting Gigmor combined my two greatest passions (apart from my family): technology and music. I couldn’t have imagined the journey ahead. High highs, low lows.

We’ve had some great victories: winning a Silicon Beach startup pitch competition, awesome coverage in the LA Times, Forbes and Billboard, achieving over $566K in share reservations in our crowdfunding campaign, gaining the trust of 50K musicians and a thousand industry pros on a bootstrapped budget.

Today the dream is becoming a reality. But we’re still in the first inning. There’s so much more to do! To make that dream happen, we need you. We need your investment now to build a live music marketplace that will attract talent and industry players around the world!

Help us make a dent in the universe! Visit our StartEngine crowdfunding campaign.

Best,

David Baird
Founder/CEO

Find Followers

Find Followers: Using Bicycle Wheel Marketing

Building an audience is one of the hardest things to do as a musician.  This technique is a tried and true way to profit and promote yourself as a musician, or band.

Bicycle Wheel Marketing

What is this Bicycle Wheel Business?

Let’s start with the basics first.  You are a musician how do you sell your tickets, music, or even merchandise?  Well, if you are in the 21st century the best way is through your website.  Your website is the best way to succeed in the music business today.  I am not going to cover how to make a website because there are enough tutorials online just search in Google [How to make a website].  What I will tell you is how to promote your website and use it to gain followers, sell out shows fast, make sales on your albums the day they release, and profit from merchandise.

Overview

Imagine a bicycle wheel.  There is a hub, which is the center.  Then you have spokes that extend out to the rim. Your website is the hub.  The rest of the internet is the rim and the spokes are the connections of your website to the rest of the internet.  Your goal is to have connections (spokes) that bring people to your website (the hub).  Your website should be a destination and not just another place for people to find out about you.

This will make more sense as you read further, I will teach you about how to get people to your site.  In the next chapter, I will go over more detail of each traffic channel.

Let’s start with the website first:

Your website is a communication tool.  You will want to have a store so you can sell tickets, music, and merchandise.  The second goal of your website is communication with current fans and prospective fans.  You want to make your website a hub for your music and information that is relevant to your target audience.  (Remember the list you created in chapter 1)

How does this work?

We’ll, besides from having your music you might want to have live recordings of shows.  This will help you start to form the foundation of trust with your potential fans.  By giving away free information people will start to trust you and give your band authority.  Taking the hub even further you could post music and interviews that you have done with other bands in your genre.  This way you will be getting in front of fans from another band helping to rapidly build your audience even bigger!!

So, what kind of stuff do you want to post on your website?

Many marketers have preached that “content is king”.  This sounds good, but what does it mean?  Content is information that you create to connect with an audience.  The most important piece of content that you can create is one that speaks to your target audience.  So, how do you do this?  Well first off most people coming to your website are looking for information about your band such as post music, music videos, and articles about your band.  Create story’s that are about how your fans help you. Tell your fans how important they are to you.  Use your media to connect with your fans.  Here are some ideas below of how to progress:

 

 

 Join Gigmor

Youtube IconVideo – This is a great way to show your band in action.  A music video helps people feel like they are there watching you.  Create an interview that shows the “behind the scenes”; what it’s like to get ready for a show.  Connect with fans.   Be creative but the best thing you can do is show yourself as you really are.   An interview will help fans connect with you on a deeper personal level.

 

Sound Cloud ImageAudio – This not only includes your music this can be a podcast of your favorite songs.  It can also be an interview with your band members.  The point of this media is to make people feel connected to you.

 

 

 

Written IconWritten – Use a blog to post articles about your band.  Tell a story speaking to your fans telling them how much they mean to you.  You can get really creative, telling fans to send in articles of how the show went for them.  You can post the best article on your site. Get creative and tell a story about your band and the fans.

 

 

Infographic iconInfographic – An infographic is a style of media that uses clipart and pictures with information to communicate an idea.  This type of content is very effective in communicating an idea.  The trick is to be selective in what you want to communicate.

 

 

Comment IconComments – This highly overlooked activity is one of the most important techniques.  Whenever your fans comment on a blog, respond to each comment.  This takes time but it shows you care about your followers.

 

 

Use your content to tell your unique story. Don’t just post and pray. Calculate and think about what you are posting and what effect it will have on your communication with your following. In today’s competitive music industry, you will want to get people to follow your band. This means telling a story that shows your authenticity and connects to the emotions of your audience in order to create raving fans. Now, you should have a good foundation of your marketing foundation.  The website is your hub.  Continue to the next chapter to learn about getting people to your site.

 

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